Business of the Month


17614 240th St. 

Hutchinson, MN 55350

Founded in 2012, the Minnesota Pottery Festival has set out to provide a venue for high quality clay artists to educate and engage with an increasingly knowledgeable public by raising the public’s appreciation and understanding of pottery and help broaden the depth and breadth of ceramic arts in Minnesota.

The Minnesota Pottery Festival is one of a growing group of organized festivals throughout the United States; part of a movement within the fire craft industry of emerging independent art shows being run by artists instead of professional promoters or other for-profit organizations.

The Minnesota Pottery Festival was first imagined at the 2009 Cambridge Pottery Festival in Wisconsin. Encouragement was added by two potters who have organized the Western North Carolina Pottery Festival in Dillsboro, North Carolina.

The first festival started with fifteen potters from seven states and in six years has grown to thirty five potters from ten states. The festival provides the public with access to a mix of many types of potters from across the country and creates an opportunity for public to interact directly with them to share knowledge about all types of ceramic arts. The audience has steadily grown as well from an estimated 1,200 in 2012 to 1,800 in 2016.

In 2017 MN Pottery Festival will feature 35 potters from Minnesota and twelve other states as from away as Maine, Texas. Georgia, Nebraska, and North Carolina. The Festival will be held on July 29th from 10am-5pm and Sunday July 30th from noon-4pm at Clay Coyote Gallery & Pottery. The Festival is free and open to all audiences. They offer a full day of programming, learning opportunities, and kid-specific activities.

The Minnesota Pottery Festival mission is to provide a venue for high quality clay artists to educate and engage with an increasingly knowledgeable public by raising the public’s appreciation and understanding of pottery and help broaden the depth and breadth of ceramic arts in Minnesota.

The MN Pottery Festival is a truly unique experience.

  • Not only can you see the work from 35 potters this year from all over the country, it’s an opportunity to interact with them and learn about their art.
  • We do not have admission or parking fees with the intent to encourage families and all individuals to come.
  • We have a supervised Kid’s Station where children can try making a piece and come back to pick it up after it is fired.
  • A potter from North Carolina brings up his Raku kiln for everyone to learn about the process.
  • There is a Pottery Olympics tent where the potters can compete against each other for amazing prizes. The blindfolded competition is always a crowd pleaser. This year the top winner will go home with a Shimpo Whisper Wheel.
  • The Phoenix Drumline will have a food tent as a fundraiser with lunch and snacks.
  • The Crow River Winery will be here with refreshing beverages.
  • And of course the best part is being able to meet, interact and learn from all potters who are very willing to share. Our potters tell us that they like to come back since we take good care of them and provide them with a broad group of customers and collectors.

We asked Betsy from MN Pottery Festival what would surprise people the most and she exclaimed, “Most people are not aware that we are a non-profit organization. This enables us to apply for grants to expand our marketing to reach a broader audience. We work with several funding organizations and local, state, and nationwide sponsors. This year we expect to see more than 2,000 attendees over the two days; historically 60% of them come from around the state and are exposed to our community.

What does Minnesota Pottery Festival enjoy most about their Chamber membership?

“We appreciate being a member of the Chamber of Commerce and their social arm the Hutchinson Ambassadors for their support of local businesses, whether it is a funding support, local marketing, or networking, we couldn’t do this event without the support of the Hutchinson community.”